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Group Mural
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Type: Projects   Skills: Language & LiteracyPlay & CreativitySocial & Emotional Skills
Most of us probably think that the ability to recognize letters and numbers is the key to being ready for kindergarten. But research shows that a child’s ability to socialize with other children is just as important. There’s a definite link between strong social skills and how a child adjusts to and performs in school. In this activity, you’ll learn how a group mural can promote cooperative play. Group Mural
What We Learn
Cooperation
Sharing
Communication
Supply List
Old bed sheet
Paint
Brushes
Markers
How-To
Creating a group mural is easy. Simply find an old bed sheet to use as your large canvas. If you don’t have an old bed sheet, you can create a canvas by taping together brown paper bags or sheets of newspaper.

Before your children start creating their group mural, discuss with them what they would like to paint. Have them agree with each other on what the theme of the mural will be.

On a separate poster board or sheet of paper, you can write down all of the children’s ideas and who is responsible for drawing what.

Then provide your children with a variety of paints, brushes and markers and let them begin creating their work of art.

When they’re done with their mural, be sure to hang it on a wall or someplace where all the children can see it. Ask the children open-ended questions about what their mural means and how each of them contributed to its creation.

As children are painting the mural, they are learning about working with others. They’ll work together to come up with a theme, and then work together to have their mural reflect that theme. In coming up with a central theme for the mural as well as in negotiating the use of these materials, kids will be learning to communicate, which is an important social skill.

This activity is appropriate for kids of all ages, but only kids who are slightly older (four or five years of age) will be able to discuss and agree upon a theme.
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